SpaceX Starship Prototype Finally Flies a Brief Hop

SpaceX Starship Prototype Finally Flies a Brief Hop

The test seemed to have some minor issues. SpaceX released a video of the flight in which it showed some debris flying off the launch stand after take-off, while part of the Raptor engine seemed to be on fire as the vehicle landed. None of these appeared to affect the flight of the vehicle

Fremont, CA: A prototype of SpaceX’s starship next-generation reusable launch vehicle flies a brief a hop on August 4 at the company’s South Texas test site after a period of delays and testing setbacks.

Powered by a single Raptor engine, the Starship SN5 vehicle took off shortly before 8 p.m. Eastern at SpaceX’s site in Boca Chica, Texas. The flight was planned to reach an altitude of 150 meters, even though SpaceX did not reveal the exact altitude the vehicle reached.

Top 10 Space Tech Solution Companies - 2020After shoring a short distance sideways, the flight came down to a landing on a nearby pad about 45 seconds after take-off. Six landing legs, folded underneath the skirt surrounding the engine bay, deployed shortly before landing.

The test seemed to have some minor issues. SpaceX released a video of the flight in which it showed some debris flying off the launch stand after take-off, while part of the Raptor engine seemed to be on fire as the vehicle landed. None of these appeared to affect the flight of the vehicle.

SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk appeared contended with the test. Nevertheless, this test flight is months behind a schedule Musk, which was set last September. The Mark 1 prototype was destroyed in a tanking test last November. Three other Starship prototypes were also demolished in later tests, including the SN4 vehicle that exploded after a static-fire test on May 29.

At the time of an event last September, NASA was criticizing SpaceX for appearing to invest more attention to Starship than its Crew Dragon commercial crew vehicle, which the agency was expecting SpaceX to complete to allow for the return of human orbital spaceflight to the United States.

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