Hydrogen Aircraft for Zero-Emission Commercial Aircraft

Assistance from governments would be crucial to fulfill these goals, mainly to fund research and technology, digitalization, and mechanisms that could help airlines retire older and less environmentally-friendly aircraft.

Fremont, CA: Many companies are looking for sustainable and alternative fuels to minimize emissions, increase domestic energy sources, expand the supply and produce economic development in rural communities. Today, jet fuel meets the need for safe, efficient, and economical high-speed travel. It is considered the most feasible fuel with a high energy per unit mass, stability, non-volatility, and low toxicity.

Apart from jet fuel, some alternatives have been explored with various levels of success. Airbus introduced three concepts for their world’s first new zero-emission commercial aircraft in September, each representing a different approach to different technology pathways and aerodynamic configurations and could fly as early as 2035.

Codenamed “ZEROe,” all of Airbus’s concepts depend on hydrogen as the main power source, an idea that could greatly decrease aviation’s climate impact for good.

The first design is a turbofan with a range of over 2,000 nautical miles. This aircraft can operate transcontinentally and would be fuelled by a hydrogen-powered modified gas-turbine engine. The tanks would be placed behind the rear pressure bulkhead. The second design is a smaller turboprop that could travel over 1,000 natural miles and would be suitable for short-haul trips. The final design is a “blended-wing body” in which the wings join with the main body. Its exceptional wide fuselage opens up many possibilities for hydrogen storage and distribution.

The ZEROes could be the first climate-neutral, zero-emission commercial aircraft. However, the entire aviation environment will need to rise to the challenge in order for these airplanes to become popular.

Assistance from governments would be crucial to fulfill these goals, in particular, to fund research and technology, digitalization, and mechanisms that could help airlines retire older and less environmentally-friendly aircraft. The industry will undoubtedly tackle the challenge of scaling up renewable energy and hydrogen for the sustainable future of aviation with the help of governments and airports.

Check Out This : Energy Procurement

Weekly Brief