How Cloud Computing Facilitates Defense Operations

Once it comes to data sharing between a modern and a legacy platform, multi-core processors and virtualization can help run new and old codes while also providing security separation between the different functions.

Fremont, CA: Defence began developing its cloud computing infrastructure nearly a decade ago, with the US Armed Forces at the forefront of the modernization effort. Within a military structure, data would be available to both combat as well as non-combat organizations. The private sector paved the way for cloud computing, and the defense ministries have benefited from the available solutions. Given are few examples how cloud computing facilitates defense operations.

Localization

Because of data security concerns, military organizations initially developed their own cloud solutions on infrastructure that would be physically monitored and controlled by them. This was also associated with the service providers' lack of geographical spread of data centers. When the latter invested in constructing data centers within the customer's borders, the expansion of cloud computing accelerated.

Virtualization

Once it comes to data sharing between a modern and a legacy platform, multi-core processors and virtualization can help run new and old codes while also providing security separation between the different functions.

Onboard Data Analysis

With data becoming the core of cloud computing, we should expect an increase in the demand for sensor data analysis. In other words, the sensors or platforms that integrate it will have to perform a portion of the total analysis onboard before transmitting it to other C2 nodes, where other users will acquire it to perform additional analysis appropriate for the task.

Security

Because of the sensitivity and importance of the data that can be stored on clouds, security in defense is crucial. Security in contested environments, such as the battlefield, is, nevertheless, different for a variety of reasons. The lack of fixed infrastructure is especially important for them, and as a result, forces rely on various wavelengths to transmit data. This gives the adversary the ability to not only intercept and access the data but also to jam and interrupt the transmission.

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