What Challenges Do Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Face?

Fremont, CA: The market for unmanned aerial vehicles is exploding. According to the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), the US drone sector will create over 100,000 employment and contribute 82 million dollars to the economy by 2025.

While tremendous development gets projected in this sector, it doesn't mean there aren't hurdles to overcome. Concerns about unmanned systems' safety, privacy, security, and power are essential in their long-term success.

Let's see challenges Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Face

  • SAFETY

Commercial unmanned aerial vehicles, like recreational drones, rely on global positioning systems for navigation. It provides controllers with a precise read on a vehicle's location, even when it is a long-distance away.

The problem is that the GPS may fail to notify controllers of what is in the surrounding vicinity. Unmanned aerial vehicles can interfere with other aircraft's flight patterns and pose possible safety hazards if they cannot distinguish other flying objects.

Geofencing addresses this issue by erecting a virtual barrier to which drones comply. These pre-programmed no-fly zones keep unmanned systems out of restricted regions and altitudes where they may interfere with manned aircraft activities.

  • POWER

When unmanned aerial vehicles can stay in flight for extended periods, their economic effect increases; they can, for example, carry parcels and medication to more remote locations, cover bigger areas in mapping applications, and efficiently execute infrastructure surveillance.

While battery and motor technology developments are critical for extended flight periods, the weight of unmanned aerial vehicles is also a factor. It is feasible to gain longer flight periods and extend the applications of your technology by developing and manufacturing lightweight parts for your system.

  • PRIVACY

Unmanned aerial vehicles may collect a wealth of data. Aside from camera monitoring, the systems might contain sensors that detect noises, magnetic fields, and chemical composition, among other things.

The public may see this data collection as invasive, almost as if they are getting watched on a fundamental level. Concerns about personal privacy have driven the introduction of federal laws.

  • SECURITY

Unmanned aerial vehicles can collect a massive amount of data. In addition to video monitoring, the systems may contain sensors that detect noises, magnetic fields, and chemical composition, among other things.

On a fundamental level, the public may see this data collection as intrusive, almost as if it is getting spied on. These worries about personal privacy have driven the introduction of federal law.

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