Virgin Orbit Completes Environmental Review to Launch Satellites from Guam

Virgin Orbit Completes Environmental Review to Launch Satellites from Guam

Virgin Orbit, a spinoff of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic, proposes to launch tiny satellites weighing up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds). The business successfully launched its first satellite in January and second in June from California's Mojave Air and Space Port.

Fremont, CA: Virgin Orbit is one step closer to receiving permission to launch satellites from Guam, a US territory in the Western Pacific.

The Federal Aviation Administration released its final environmental assessment on Aug. 27 and stated that Virgin Orbit's use of its Boeing 747-400 carrier aircraft and LauncherOne rocket from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam would have "no significant impact."

Virgin Orbit, a spinoff of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic, proposes to launch tiny satellites weighing up to 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds). The business successfully launched its first satellite in January and second in June from California's Mojave Air and Space Port. As soon as Virgin Orbit's license is obtained, the company plans to launch from Spaceport Cornwall in England and Andersen Air Force in Denmark.

The LauncherOne rockets are launched from a Boeing carrier aircraft at an altitude of around 45,000 feet. After then, the rockets fire their engines and blast off into space.

The 36th Wing of the US Air Force at Andersen took part in the environmental study. According to the FAA, Virgin Orbit would undertake integration, mating, propellant loading operations, and takeoff and landing operations on Andersen Air Force Base. There would be no construction or ground-disturbing operations and no changes to the current infrastructure on Andersen.

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