Three Technologies in Maritime Search and Rescue Operations

Three Technologies in Maritime Search and Rescue Operations

MEOSAR has global satellite coverage and near-instant distress beacon detection, accurate beacon location calculation and a unique Return Link Service feature that supports receipt of the distress signal.

Fremont, CA: Search and rescue (SAR) includes many areas which are based on the type of terrain the search is conducted. These can be mountain rescue, ground search and rescue, urban search and rescue, combat search and rescue and air-sea rescue over water.

Maritime search and rescue is conducted at sea to save sailors and passengers in distress. It can be carried out by agencies or by coast guards, navy or voluntary organizations. They deploy helicopters, rescue vessels or other suitable vessels to return them to land. At times, the agencies may carry out an air-sea rescue (ASR) which uses aircraft and surface vessels.

Here are three maritime SAR technologies:

Amphibious Aircraft

This type of aircraft can take off and land on both land and water. Amphibious aircraft are heavier, slower, more complex and expensive to purchase and operate but more agile compared to land planes. These aircraft are faster and have a longer range as it can achieve almost the range of land-based aircraft.

Drones

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and drone are gaining popularity in SAP operations. Drones are used as a first response to evaluate accident scenes, find emergency routes and identify potential survivors. It can fly to an emergency location n the waters and drop life preserver rings directly to people in distress.

UAVs equipped with high-resolution cameras, IR and thermal imaging, datalinks and other sensors can cover a vast stretch of the ocean and mark the location if they find mariners in distress and transmit real-time video information to coastguard vessels or command-and-control aircraft in the area.

MEOSAR

The Cospas-Sarsat international satellite SAR system have helped rescue almost 40,000 lives by identifying the location of emergency distress beacon signals. The next-generation version of Cospas-Sarsat called MEOSAR (Medium Earth Orbit Search and Rescue) is anticipated to transform the overall SAR process.

MEOSAR have global satellite coverage and near-instant distress beacon detection, accurate beacon location calculation and a unique Return Link Service feature that supports receipt of the distress signal. With this system, a distress beacon can be identified within 100 meters 95 percent of the time and within 5 minutes.

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