Nasa's Rocket Launch in Australia Creates History

The suborbital rocket took off from the remote site early this week. It will allow astrophysics analyses that can only be embarked in the Southern Hemisphere. The launch was also the first in Australia in more than 25 years of period. Northern Territory Chief Minister Natasha Fyles hailed the launch as an incredibly proud moment for Australia.

FREMONT, CA : A modest patch of red dirt in a remote location in Australia has made history as the spot of Nasa's first rocket launch from a commercial spaceport outside the USA. The sub-orbital rocket took off from the tiny site early this week. It will allow astrophysics analyses that can only be embarked in the Southern Hemisphere. The launch was also the first in Australia in more than 25 years of period. The rocket is Nasa's first of three to take off from the recently constructed Arnhem Space Centre in the Northern Territory of Australia. Scientists expect it will enable them to study the influence of a star's light on the habitability of planets in proximity.

Spectators who journeyed to the remote site witnessed the rocket for only about ten seconds before it shot out of view. The sounding rocket's tenure in space was similarly short. The 13m-long rocket fell back to Earth after a scheduled 15 minutes. But the data collected by the mission's X-ray camera at that time will help illustrate the mysteries of Alpha Centauri A and B, the nearest double-star system to Earth that is situated just 4.3 light-years away. Northern Territory Chief Minister Natasha Fyles hailed the launch as an incredibly proud moment for Australia, adding it was accomplished with the blessing of the region's Aboriginal traditional landlords.

Nasa consulted with Aboriginal guardians of the land before the launch. Australia has increased its space efforts in recent times, revealing a defence agency concentrated on contradicting Russia and China's ambitions in space. The Arnhem Space Centre is the first and only commercially possessed and run equatorial launch site in the world. This was a remarkable feat and made a tremendous mark in the history of Australia's expedition into space. The next launch is anticipated to take place on 4th July. Nasa has committed to collecting all materials and debris and returning them to the US.

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