China's iSpace Met with Failure at the Second Orbital Launch Attempt

China's iSpace Met with Failure at the Second Orbital Launch Attempt

Later pictures suggested that the launch did not go according to schedule. Nevertheless, the Chinese state media did not report on the launch over three hours later at the time of reporting. A news article (Chinese) was released after 7:00 a.m. Eastern.

FREMONT, CA: The Launch of a Hyperbola-1 rocket by Chinese private firm iSpace ended in apparent failure shortly after takeoff from Jiuquan launch center Monday.

Hyperbola-1 four-stage solid rocket was lifted from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the Gobi Desert at about 3:00 a.m. East. East.

The launch itself took place just hours after the issue of the navigation warning and without any official warning or publicity. Apparent amateur video popped on Chinese social media shortly after the takeoff.

Later pictures suggested that the launch did not go according to schedule. Nevertheless, the Chinese state media did not report on the launch over three hours later at the time of reporting. A news article (Chinese) was released after 7:00 a.m. Eastern.

The launch failure comes 18 months after iSpace became the first nominally private Chinese launch company to reach orbit with the first Hyperbola-1 rocket.

That performance was followed by unsuccessful attempts by fellow Chinese companies Landspace and Onespace in October 2018 and March 2019, respectively.

Hyperbola-1 comprises three solid stages with a liquid-propellant fourth stage, with a length of 20.8 meters as well as a mass at takeoff of about 31 metric tonnes. The rocket includes three solid stages and a fourth stage liquid-propellant.

Photos of the first and second Hyperbola-1 rockets show significant design changes between the two launches.

Numerous Chinese commercial space companies have emerged since the government's decision to open up the launch and small satellite sectors to private capital in 2014. The new companies were largely founded by former employees of the major state-owned space conglomerates CASC, CASIC, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and related actors.

Firms have attracted private funding and, in some cases, are also funded by state-linked investment funds. Companies have obtained funding in the form of policy support, assistance from giant state-owned space contractors, regional and local government contracts, and Military-Civil Fusion (MCF).

MCF is a national strategy that promotes the sharing of knowledge, capital and technology with the goal of promoting innovation, reducing costs and creating new supply chains.

Weekly Brief